Ed Fahey

Adventures – Saloon,Sportscar/GT racing

Posts Tagged ‘Peugeot’

ITCC Rounds 7/8 – The Finals

Posted by Ed Fahey on September 29, 2010

Catch me if you can...

Rounds 7/8 of the Irish Touring Car Championship and again at Mondello, except this time on the longer 3.5km ‘international’ circuit that in the past was used for the British Touring Car Championship, so I concentrated most of my efforts on the longer track, as there are a few interesting sections on it not to mention the cars can stretch their legs a bit more.

Instead of a race overview, Ill be describing what I was actually doing on this day – the role of official photographer, interspersed with what happened during the races.

In the points, Martin Tracey in his Westward Engineering Ford Sierra RS500 just needed good results to secure the championship, with Stephen Maher in the S Maher Construction BMW M3 Compact in a similar position to take the rookie championship.

A different view of Mondello

Out for qualifying and a slightly different area I found to take pics was the outside of Turn 3 – purely for the climb and drop into Turn 4, making Mondello Park look like Lime Rock Park almost. Its a rarely photographed part of Mondello and Im surprised more photographers dont go there. Maybe its due to the long walk or that you need a 4×4 if you want to drive there…

Turn 3 also backs onto Turn 5/Lola which is one of the faster bends on the track, so a quick run (through mud and wet grass usually) and you have 2 decent corners to photograph. With there being 3 ITCC sessions today (qualifying and 2 races) there was more time to move about the track.

In qualifying it was Brian Sexton in the Jomo Engineering Mitsubishi Evo 6 on pole, over half a second ahead of Martin Tracey in the Westward Engineering Ford Sierra RS500 Cosworth and Johnny Whelan in his very yellow Bikez.ie Peugeot 306 making up the Top 3 on the grid with Barry Rabbitt in the Tuning Factory Integra 4th. Unfortunatley for Sexton, the Evo expired during qualifying and sadly for him he was unable to take his place on the grid, so Tracey and everyone else moved up a spot.

Action - everywhere

Onto the first race and I head to Turns 7a/7b a double right hander and one of the main overtaking spots on the International track, as its at the end of a reasonable length straight so its a prime outbraking spot. This corner is a good bit into the ‘lap’ so any early attacks are over and the race is settling down as they approach me. Tracey is already pulling ahead as usual, excpet he has Whelan not too far away and who closes right in under braking for 7a. These 2 pull away slowly leaving Rabbitt, Philip Burdock in his B-Racing Honda Civic and Tomas O’Rourke in his Ferrybank Motors Opel Astra to squabble among themselves, while all down through the field there are battles, there are not any cars on their own, everyone seems to have at least one car to battle with, which makes for some great photos, but with only 8 laps I had to move along quickly to capture different angles of the action, so from 7b, about half way up, then onto the apex of Turn 8/Birranes bends to catch the cars riding the kerbs.

Squabbling For the record Matrin Tracey held on to win, after being pushed almost the entire way by Johnny Whelan, who then suffered braking issues and ended up in the gravel at turn 3 as a result, but it was good to see Tracey being given a bit of a run instead of casually walking away with the race.

After this exciting race, could it get any better? Yes it could!

Race 2, and I decided to go on the inside of the approach to Lola which backs onto Devaneys, a double left hander which then leads the cars back into Bikeworld and rejoins the shorter track, so I could walk between the 2 bends and get more of the frequent action and like the last race was almost entirely groups of cars circulating rather than cars on their own.

Into Lola...

Race 2 and Barry Rabbitt was the man on the move, getting into second behind Johnny Whelan, behind Martin Tracey who led from the lights. Whelan then overcame Rabbit, Tomas O’Rourke then also got past Rabbitt, leaving him to scrap it out with Philip Burdock once again as he had done in the first race, and apart from the various retirements or the lead few cars thats the only recollections I can give of the race, since I concentrated on photos, given the fast and furious action going on all around me, overtaking and just general dicing, it was certainly the finest racing Id seen in a long time and all clean too with no deliberate contact! Martin Tracey stayed ahead to win and to seal the inagural ITCC championship, with Stephen Maher sealing the Rookie championship

My colleague Stephen, however was tasked with making notes of what happened during the day, and his report of the day can be seen here

Ed Fahey – September 2010

Addional photos from the day can be seen here

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Le Mans 2010 – Part 3 – The Race

Posted by Ed Fahey on July 5, 2010

Audi R8 Safety Car - 1 of 3 for the race

After the buildup and support races its time for the big one – The 78th running of the Le Mans 24 hour race. I am standing in the pitlane just before the cars are brought out onto the grid and you can almost physically feel the tension mounting. Drivers, celebrities, team personnel and fans all flooding the pitlane, something you would never get in F1.

Nick Mason with David Brabham and Marino Franchitti

It felt like I was in the old pre 1991 pits with the sheer amount of people wandering about, the walls of people parting, red sea like as the next car was pushed out towards the grid, with plenty of whistle blowing marshals to move people out of the way. The fact some of them had to be pushed throught a 3 or 4 point turn to get onto the grid all added to the amusement of it all. Again a big thanks to Kangaroo TV as Id won a competiton they had organsied to win some pit/paddock passes, without these Id not have got as close. Like the practice/qualifying days previously there was some frantic work going on in some garages, while in others, mainly Audi/Peugeot they were ready and waiting for the task ahead, for them it was going to be a formality – or would it?

In the rush

In the midst of the pits though, the Rolex clock was ticking down the hours towards 15.00 local time and the start, even at 13.00, 2 hours before the start it was busy,in any other race the rush doesnt start until 40mins before the start, and your asked to leave a mere 5 minutes before the start! It was an unusual experiance to feel someone squeezing past you, to turn and find it was a driver or team principal desperatley trying to get to the grid, you just wouldnt see this in F1, its too commericalised! I didnt bother trying to force my way onto the grid as it seemed even busier than the pitlane, a reminder of the Tokyo Subway in rush hour. Inbetween the grid girls, the Patrouille de France flying over and various  people who appeared to be exceptionally wealthy wandering about, at times you forgot a race would be starting soon!

Audi R15 Plus - ready to go

By mingling in the pit/paddock area though, myself and my companion for the adventure – Stephen – had missed the chance to view the race from the terraces opposite the start/finish straight as people had been sat here since 8am. We decided to walk to the beginning of the ‘arena’ side of the circuit – The Porsche curves, and find ourselves landed in a slice of Denmark, evident by the lineup of Danish registered coaches and then several hundred Danes wearing the hats of their heroes – Tom Kristensen or Jan Magnussen. Denmark currently has no F1 drivers so this is the next best thing! Following the action on the Kangaroo TV, you could see the cars being started to head off on the formation lap, and as they went out onto the Mulsanne,you hear them in the distance as they got closer. Despite the loud Danes, a group of loud French fans are close by also, making as much noise as possible for the Pole sitting #3 Peugeot as it glides by, then an even louder roar from behind us as the #7 Audi, which will be driven by Kristensen later, then another cheer for the #63 Corvette, with Jan Magnussen at the wheel, its rare to see such passion in motorsport outside of rallying or F1, its like being at a football game when the teams run on before the start.

Just after 15.00 and still sat amongst the dedicated Danes  the race has begun. Immediatley the 4 Peugeot 908’s LMP1’s shoot off into the distance, pursued by the 3 Audi R15 LMP1’s but already they are a reasonable distance ahead of the Lola Aston Martins and the Oreca-AIM,

Race Start - Porsches at the Porsche Curves

the leading petrol LMP1 cars, so obviously the rule changes to try and equalise the petrol/diesel LMP1 cars at the start of 2010 have not worked. Also noticeable is how quickly the HPD/Acura ARX-01’s are ahead in LMP2 and that several GT2 cars are already ahead of GT1 cars – but then again GT2’s these days are mostly faster than GT1’s !  Like my visit to Silverstone for the Le Mans Series race in 2009, it is not long before the diesels are already lapping the slower GT2 cars,  and just 1 lap in, a car has already ground to a halt on the Mulsanne, the Autocon LMP2 Lola. Within 3 more laps the GT2 Jaguar XKR is lost and the first high profile retirement as the #5 LMP1 Beechdean-Mansell Ginetta-Zytek with Nigel Mansell at the wheel suffers a dramatic blowout near Indianapolis and gets pitched into the barriers as a result, meaning the 3 Audi R8 Safety Cars make their first appearence of the race, the track being so long – 8.5 miles / 13.6 km that 1 Safety Car cannot neutralise the race quickly enough.

Dusk on the start/finish straight

We slowly make our way back to the main start/finish straight area heading to the Esses and Tertre Rouge and then use the paddock passes to have a slow and unrushed evening meal in the paddock restaurant, beating the queues of the main restaurants/bars and being able to sit down and observe the paddock activity. It feels odd seeing Lord Drayson with his kids wandering about or a trio of JLOC mechanics sit cross-legged on the ground eating their noodles, not to mention the highly relaxed Audi mechanics calmly watching the race unfold, all as a dramatic sunset was visible.

The atmosphere seemed different, calmer, as now the initial excitement of the start and first few laps was over, we were settling down now to the night section, approx 1/4 through the race. Already 1 Peugeot has fallen levelling it to 3 Peugeots vs 3 Audis for the overall lead, the only decent scrap taking place ontrack is the GT2 lead battle between the Risi Ferrari 430 and the Corvette Racing C6R ZR1.

007 Lola-Aston Martin leaves the pits to rejoin at dusk

As the sun sets, we go to a bar that overlooks the pit entrance, despite looking like an exclusive VIP bar, its a simple case of elbowing your way to the front and ignoring ignorant Germans who try and claim where they are is ‘private’. Little do they know that the Irish are not renowned as a nation that takes shit of any kind. Anyway, they had not put their beach towels down or similar down on the chairs so, a disregard for their claims their area is ‘private’ and you are rewarded with a fine view of the start finish straight and pit exit, down into the the Dunlop chicane as the cars blast past and exit the pits, once again its the Corvettes that win in the noise stakes here, an ‘explosion’ of V8 as they turn off their speed limiters and give it full throttle exiting the pits, with the Aston Martin V12’s in the Lola LMP1 and DBR9 a close second. As the sun sets, the stands empty slightly, as people drift away from the race for a while, but Steve and I are only getting started and want to get really close so off to Les Hunaudieres or The Mulsanne Straight.

Mulsanne Chicane in the early hours of Sunday

The Le Mans circuit or Circuit de la Sarthe to give it its official name is a mixture of public roads and purpose built circuit, the high speed bits are public road, so when the sat nav tries to send you down these very roads its a case of resorting to map based methods and using a sense of direction. Spectating along the straight is banned and you frequently hear stories of those who risk hiking thorugh pitch black fields, trespassing through gardens and usually ending with a confrontation with the Gendarmes (the no messing arm of the French police) for the thrill of just a few minutes next to the barrier with the cars screaming past. But thanks to the Club Arnage guide a little gem of a place is our destination – Hotel Arbor, which is on the side of the road from Le Mans to Mulsanne – aka Mulsanne straight, so today we must find it using back roads and enter through the back gate. After a little bit of offtrack excursion, a stern but polite female Gendarme directs us to where we need to go and for me the highlight of the 24 hours, a true Nirvana moment, for we are now less than 10 ft away from where the cars are going flat out on the Mulsanne, all for the pricely sum of €10, far better value than a tribune (grandstand seat).

The video below (filmed by me for a change) gives an insight into the raw experiance this was. Not being an official spectating area, there is no PA system, or big screen its just you and the cars. Its one of the few places on the track where the cars can be heard going totally flat out in 5th/6th gear, then dropping down to 2nd/3rd for the chicane, then hard on the power again. You dont hear them, you can feel them, proven when Im sat in the car and there are vibrations in the footwell. We stayed here for at least 3 hours, and somehow I managed to sleep for a tad, if your tired enough you will sleep anywhere….

After this it was off to the Mulsanne corner enclosure just as the sun was beginning to rise, but with a big screen and Radio Le Mans to keep you going it didnt feel as if the race had lasted for 13 hours already. This section of the track was surprising as I didnt think the public enclosure would be as big as it was, so not only could you watch at the corner, but a decent distance uptrack too towards Indianapolis so you could watch the cars

Mulsanne corner in the early hours

accelerating hard, the darkness added to it with glowing brake disks leading into the corner then glowing exhausts visible as they vanished into the night. This being a poor area for clear photos, I spent 10mins getting 1/2 decent shots, then sat down and just tried to do as little as possible, conserving energy and just relaxing, if thats possible at a sportscar event!

The easiest way to relax is to listen to Radio Le Mans, as good as John Hindhaugh and Paul Trusswell are, I think the laid back style of Jim Roller and Charles Dressing are easier to listen to when your half asleep, updating and just talking about the race as it unfolds. The rate of attrition this year is high and already a large number of cars are out, but its not over until 15.00 later which being 10 hours away seems like a lifetime right now. To think that a F1 race lasts no more than 90 minutes and the amount of retirements then, really shows how much of a test Le Mans is on a car, with similar speeds being done also.

Sunrise

It seems only the hardcore spectators are left now, the hoards of people about when the race started are either in their tents asleep or at the numerous bars and restaurants, but plenty of evidence is everywhere of the previous hours actitivites with piles of discarded beercans and bottles about. For some people it seems Le Mans is an excuse to drink as much as possible, then spend the rest of it comatose, but not for me and plenty others it would seem. It feels like Im sat in the crowd at a tennis match, everyone sat in a row, in silence, the sound of the cars passing is the only thing keeping us awake, but as soon as the sun rises you can feel a little strength return, so its time to consume the only can of red bull I intend having, quickly followed by a full bottle of mineral water, to balance out red bulls dehydrating effect and it works as I can feel the energy return over the next 90mins. Being summer its bright by 6am so time to leave the Mulsanne and head back to the arena to follow what is probably the hardest part of the race for everyone, the morning after the night before.

Up until this point its has been a balanced Peugeot vs Audi battle- but at 7am, just as people are beginning to wake up, they get a massive alarm clock call when the #2 Peugeot coasts into Tetre Rouge, flames pouring out of 1 side. This car has led the majority of the race, with a comfortable gap to second place, yet its now all over and its down to 2 Peugeots vs 3 Audis…

7am - the beginning of the end for Peugeot

After a relatively bland night and total domination in practice and qualifying by Peugeot, now it seems a second win in a row could slip from their grasp,and with 8 hours still to go, this race will be anything but dull, as the Audis still circulate. The radio comes alive as their pit reporter witness the crew of #2 behind their garage, clearly despondent, but still they have #1 and the semi works Oreca #4 cars in it and #1 is 3rd as Audi #9 has now inheritied the lead. Over the last 8 hours it becomes a truly unpredictable race as the #1 Peugeot expires, but not before eliminating the GT2 leading #64 Corvette in a controversial overtake, in an attempt to catch the now leading #9 Audi. Reports of a Peugeot pit full of men in tears seemed unexaggerated and it was left to the #4 Oreca Peugeot to take Peugeot honours. but then, just when you thought things had settled, the #4 Peugeot dies in the same circumstances as #1 and #2, leaving the entire team inconsolable, none more than Oreca team boss Hugues de Chaunac who is totally traumatised . By this stage we are in the enclosure beside the start/finish straight, half asleep but in a much better state than some people, the Dutch have perfected the ancient art of sleeping standing up it would seem.

The end - Audi victory

And so as the race concludes its a clear 1-2-3 for Audi, Peugeot just pushed too hard and paid the price on all 4 cars, 1 suffering suspension/chassis damage, most likely due to being thrown over the kerbs and the other 3 all suffering similar engine failures, so it was left to Audi for a clear 1-2-3 finish and another diesel domination. The best placed petrol powered car was the Oreca-AIM LMP1 car and first LMP2 was next, a fantastic 5th overall for the Strakka Racing HPD ARX-01C, beating the highly favoured identical Highcroft Racing HPD ARX-01C. GT2 beats GT1 overall,for only the second time,as the Felbermayr Porsche 997 comes home in 11th to win GT2, 7 laps ahead of the GT1 class winning Larbre Saleen S7R – a decade after the S7R had first raced and finally records a class win at Le Mans. The GT2 Porsche took full advantage of the Risi-Ferrari/Corvette retirements, in what was the best door to door racing of the 24H. All 3 Matech Ford GT’s also fall, benefitting the Saleen

In a true race of attrition there were only 27 classified finishers out of 55 starters – but the distance record, set in 1971 was finally beaten with the winning car completing 397 laps, covering over 5410 km (3362 miles), the second/third placed Audis also breaking the record.

The 1971 record was 397 laps and 5,335.313 km (3,315.210 mi) over the chicaneless 13.469 km (8.369 mi) configuration, while the current configuration (ran since 2007) is 13.629 km (8.469 mi)).

So – despite closely following it since 1996, it was my first ever Le Mans and what an experiance, a test for everyone, not just the cars. Ill be doing my utmost to return in 2011!

Ed Fahey – July 2010

For Saturday race photos click here

For Sunday race photos click here

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